Iron Ore & Pellets

Iron ores are rocks and minerals from which metallic iron can be economically extracted. Iron ore pellets are to be used as raw material for blast furnaces.

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Limestone

Limestone has numerous uses: as a building material, as aggregate for the base of roads, as white pigment or filler in products such as toothpaste or paints.

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Silica Sand

Silica sand is the most commonly used sand because of its great abundance.It is made by either crushing sandstone or taken from natural occurring locations.

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Clinker & Cement

Cement manufacturers purchasing clinker usually grind it as an addition to their own clinker at their cement plants. They also ship clinker to grinding plants in areas where cement-making raw materials are not available.

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Products - Limestone


Limestone is a sedimentary rock composed largely of the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Most limestone are composed from skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral or foraminifera.
Limestone has numerous uses:

as a building material, as aggregate for the base of roads, as white pigment or filler in products such as toothpaste or paints, and as a chemical feedstock
Limestone is very common in architecture, especially in Europe and North America. Many landmarks across the world, including the Great Pyramid and its associated complex in Giza, Egypt, are made of limestone.
Limestone and (to a lesser extent) marble are reactive to acid solutions, making acid rain a significant problem to the preservation of artifacts made from this stone. Many limestone statues and building surfaces have suffered severe damage due to acid rain. Acid-based cleaning chemicals can also etch limestone, which should only be cleaned with a neutral or mild alkaline-based cleaner.


  • Other uses include:

    It is the raw material for the manufacture of quicklime (calcium oxide), slaked lime (calcium hydroxide), cement and mortar.
  • Pulverized limestone is used as a soil conditioner to neutralize acidic soils.
  • It is crushed for use as aggregate—the solid base for many roads.
  • Geological formations of limestone are among the best petroleum reservoirs;
  • As a reagent in flue-gas desulfurization, it reacts with sulfur dioxide for air pollution control.
  • Glass making, in some circumstances, uses limestone.
  • It is added to toothpaste, paper, plastics, paint, tiles, and other materials as both white pigment and a cheap filler.
  • It can suppress methane explosions in underground coal mines.
  • Purified, it is added to bread and cereals as a source of calcium.
  • Calcium levels in livestock feed are supplemented with it, such as for poultry (when ground up).
  • It can be used for remineralizing and increasing the alkalinity of purified water to prevent pipe corrosion and to restore essential nutrient levels.
  • Used in blast furnaces, limestone binds with silica and other impurities to remove them from the iron.
  • It is often found in medicines and cosmetics.
  • It is used in sculptures because of its suitability for carving.